Journal

Leaving A Sefer Open

by R. Ari Enkin There is a lesser-known halacha that one is not permitted to leave a sefer open when one is not using it. The source for this is based on a ruling in the Shulchan Aruch. [1]YD 277:1. See also Shabbat 5b with Ran; Eruvin 98a. The Shulchan Aruch writes that after a sofer writes a column of ...

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Open Orthodox Symposium V

Afterword by Menachem Penner If there is one thing that Modern Orthodoxy should agree on, it is that open orthodoxy is a good thing. The devil, however, is not only in the details, but in the definition of “open” and the definition of “orthodoxy.” One can embrace open orthodoxy without embracing Open Orthodoxy. At the core of Modern Orthodox philosophy ...

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Open Orthodox Symposium IV

A Radical Theology and a Traditional Community: On the Contemporary Application of Izbica-Lublin Hasidut in the Jewish Community by David Bashevkin A Controversial Introduction and Introducing Controversy The specter of misinterpretation of Izbica Hasidut was already clear in 1860 with its first published work, the Mei ha-Shiloah. When introducing his grandfather’s published work, R. Gershon Henoch Leiner appended a brief ...

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Symposium on Open Orthodoxy III

Rabbi Irving (Yitz) Greenberg and His Theology of Covenant by Ira Bedzow Rabbi Irving (Yitz) Greenberg has been called one of the most influential Jewish teachers and communal leaders of the late twentieth century, and his writings have influenced – and continue to influence – Jews across the broad denominational spectrum. Joshua Feigelson, in his recent PhD dissertation, writes that ...

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Symposium on Open Orthodoxy II

The Parting of the Ways? Open Orthodox Judaism in Historical Perspective by Zev Eleff In May 2015, the Yated Ne’eman published an article on the burgeoning “Open Orthodox Movement.” [1]I am very grateful to several friends who offered comments and criticisms that improved this article. I benefited greatly from conversations and support from Yitzi Ehrenberg, Moshe Schapiro, Ben … Continue reading ...

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Symposium on Open Orthodoxy I

Introduction: Religious Polemics and Studies Gil Student The long-brewing schism in Modern Orthodox Judaism is daily becoming more evident to even casual observers. [1]For example, see Judy Maltz, “How Views on Homosexuality Are Splitting the Orthodox World,” Ha’aretz, August 5, 2015 http://www.haaretz.com/news/israel/.premium-1.669680. (retrieved … Continue reading As the schism reaches its boiling point, the heated moments of controversy bubble up more ...

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Lawyers and the Underworld

by R. Daniel Mann Question: I am a lawyer. A potential client asked me to help sue someone who is known to be part of the underworld. Should I agree based on the commandment of lo taguru (“Do not be afraid of a man” – Devarim 1:17), or is it okay for me to pass? Answer: The formal prohibition of ...

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Headcoverings and Headaches

by R. Alex Ozar Religion is hard, and it’s supposed to be: Love of God should, by nature, be the sort of thing that claims all your heart, all your soul, all your worth. [1]Devarim 6:5. Halakhic Judaism complements this truth with an equal and opposite force: God loves us, and so wills that we live, [2]See Rashi to Sanhedrin 74a, s.v. ...

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Why Are Young People Leaving Religion?

Why Are Young People Leaving Religion? Insights from an Evangelical Sociologist by R. Dr. Joshua Berman You Lost Me is the title of a recent and provocative book by David Kinnaman, a devout Christian and a sociologist. Through extensive surveys he sought to answer the question that makes up his subtitle: Why Young Christians are Leaving Church and Rethinking Faith. ...

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Love for the “Ger”

by Rav Yehuda Rock The Problem Towards the end of Parashat Ekev, Moshe contrasts God’s power and mercy, deriving a moral lesson (10:17-19): For Lord your God is the God of gods and the Lord of lords: the great, mighty, awesome God, Who does not show favor and does not take bribes; Who executes judgment for the orphan and the widow, ...

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