Audio Roundup CXLIV

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by Joel Rich

Question: Over Yom Tov I noted several bnai Yeshiva in our thoroughly modern synagogue. Some came on time and others a bit later. I noticed a few from each group who made no effort to catch up to the tzibbur for shma or shmoneh esrai but prayed at their own pace. Is anyone else seeing this practice? What is the source?


From TRADITION/ Rabbi Bleich article this issue:

Those who forbid Anisakis and similar parasites but not other organisms assess the Talmudic statements in one of two ways. Some limit the relevant Talmudic presumption to organisms with regard to which there is no compelling evidence disproving the possibility of spontaneous generation and prohibit only species found both in the viscera and flesh but accept the Talmudic statements as presumptive and hence controlling only where there is no compelling evidence to the contrary. They do not regard the relevant Talmudic statements as universal and irrebuttable and, consequently, their conclusion prohibiting Anisakis and permitting other species is not inconsistent.
Other authorities redefine the underlying Talmudic principle, not as enunciating a principle of spontaneous generation, but as a declaration that subvisual phenomena are to be disregarded. Having redefined the principle, the application involves no inconsistency or difficulty whatsoever. Any and all organisms imbibed at a stage at which they can be perceived by the naked eye are forbidden. Those imbibed while not yet visible and found in the flesh of the fish, since they have no prior juridical identity, are treated as having been generated by the fish itself. Those found in the digestive tract even if imbibed in a subvisual state, do not develop by parasitic feeding upon the flesh of the host but appropriate to themselves nutrients eaten by the fish that are found in the digestive organs and hence are treated no differently from organisms that feed in the water outside the fish.
In the opinion of this writer, the halakhic arguments of those who prohibit Anisakis-infested fish are compelling. Moreover, their resolution of the underlying confrontation serves to affirm the veracity of Talmudic teaching without ignoring empirical reality and does so in a manner that is intellectually consistent.

Me:Intellectually consistent, but is it the truth?


A little about avi mori vrabbi zll”hh http://isramom.blogspot.com/


  • Rabbi Nisson Lippa Alpert -Matan Torah and Kimu V’kiblu

    Writing this on R’YBS’s Yahrtzeit about R’Nissan Alpert in whose shiur I occasionally took up space – and you want to know why I’m feeling just a tad sub-perfect?
    Here R’NA explains the lessons of mishpatim (civil laws) being sandwiched in matan torah. Our deah (wisdom) needs to be guided by HKB”H so we can actualize his will. Also (Sibsonites from YU will recognize this as my on boarding speech) that our doing the “civil laws” based on the command of HKB”H should (will) have those around us saying “Blessed is the God of (Sibsonites fill in their name here) Shimon ben shetach”.
    Then to make me feel even better – an explanation of Kimu V’Kibblu (reacceptance of torah in the time of Esther) as a reinforcement/reminder that at our core Shushan is not our capitol, Jerusalem is (no matter where/when).

  • Rabbi Nisson Lippa Alpert – Hilchot Birchat Hamazon

    A masterful analysis of Grace after meals based on the chakira (distinction?) as to whether its primary nature is to thank HKB”H for the food; and other topics (e.g. Jerusalem) are dragged along, or is it fulfilling a more general requirement of praise. This is tied to the halacha of where we mention Shabbat in birchat hamazon.
    Do blessings imply HKB”H is the source of all blessing or that we are the recipients (it depends!)? Similarly does amen mean we are saying it is emet (true) or that it should be so (halevai) – birchat hamazon itself changed somewhat from one to the other depending on circumstances (e.g. was Jerusalem standing).
    Sheim (the name) of HKB”H reflects the representation of HKB”H in this world, so while HKB”H doesn’t need our blessings, his name does so it can be a strong instrument to represent him.
    Also addresses why we need a glass of wine (or not) in certain circumstances – is it a blessing or a shira/song).

  • Rabbi Nisson Lippa Alpert -Vezot Haberacha 5745

    The gemara includes a bracha that the guest at a meal should say for the host (me – why was it not included for many years?) which includes both material wealth and tremendous spiritual success.
    A bracha must have something to be chal (act?) on, whereas a prayer does not; thus bracha is to bring out potential – all brachot in torah should be understood this way. Thus, the special blessing in birchat hamazon is timely because the host has been machis orchim (had guests > entertaining HKB”H).
    Why was Yaakov so concerned about sending Binyamin to Egypt and not about ending the other brothers? Because Rachel (and family) had proven susceptible to the dangers of travel. So how did Yehuda change this? By being arev (cosigner?) he became one with Binyamin and changed destiny. This is how prayer acts as well (similar to R’YBS).
    HKB”H just waits for us to take 1st step! [me – R’NA had a similar thought by burning bush – “Vayar Hashem Ki Sar l’rot” – as soon as moshe turned towards the bush to investigate, HKB”H revealed himself].

  • Rav Nissan Kaplan – plane over beis hakvuros

    R’Elyashav said Kohanim couldn’t fly over Cholon graveyard. EL AL later changed flight patterns so 90% of flights don’t go that route so it’s not a problem due to combination of other leniencies (me – why isn’t this efshar l’vaer?). Then a detailed analysis of the issues involved and why those who would be lenient are incorrect.
    Worth listening to the whole shiur to hear that I was mchavein to R’SZA – Davar sheyeish lo matirin afilu b’elef to batil (some things are not annulled even 1/1000) has a limit (e.g. 1/10,000,000 would be batel!).

  • Rav Nissan Kaplan-mitzvos need kavana

    If mitzvot tzrichot kavannah (mitzvot require intention) is a torah requirement, do you have to redo the mitzvah if you didn’t have proper intent? Perhaps not if it’s done in a conducive context (e.g. shma in prayer). Perhaps “plain intent” (i.e. whatever chazal wanted) is enough. Perhaps if the mitzvah is one with physical result, intent isn’t critical. Lot’s of opinions! [me – so, again, why aren’t you yotzeh with the Rabbi’s bracha on sfirah without “negative” intent?]

  • Rabbi Moshe D. Tendler -Getting Rid of Your Chametz

    Various chameitz issues including “control” issues (e.g. pawnbroker, ownership of stock in a company).
    Homeopathic medicine – a shoteh (fool) is patur (exempt) from mitzvot!
    Other topics include liquors, soy sauce, non-edibles, achshevei (if you consider it food it is) davar hamamad (forming agent?) and avida l’tameih (put in for taste).

  • Rabbi Hershel Schachter-Shiur #98 – Pesachim – Shiur-98Pesachim ספירת העומר קידוש במקום סעודה.

    Sfirah – is it drabanan (rabbinic) or duraita (torah)? If drabanan, is it a drabanan sfira (patterned on duraita?) or is it a drabannan zecher lmikdash (remembrance of the temple) whose form happens to be sfira (same issue by maror). R’YBS & R’Velvel discuss.
    Why not count 2 numbers every night of sfirah due to sfeika d’yoma (uncertainty of which day it really is)? Dvar Avraham – counts (e.g. 1/10 for maaser of animals) can never be from doubt! R’YBS – so they never counted sfira in far places when we were mkadeish al pi r’eiah (sighting of moon)? R’HS – no, they did count since they generally “knew” (<2% chance of error) when rosh chodesh would be. Kiddush bmakom seudah (where the meal is) also discussed. Interesting – we assume bavli statement of R’Yochanan’s opinions are correct against Yerushalmi’s even though R’Yochanan’s students edited the Yerushalmi!

  • Dr. Marc Shapiro -Twentieth Century Rabbinic Thinkers: R. Moses Sofer (Hatam Sofer) part 3

    Round 3 – His stay in Pressburg and opposition from some towns people. His approbation and later retraction for a translation of the Talmud.

  • Rabbi Nisson Lippa Alpert -Behukotai, Bamidbar

    Pirkei Avot – Analysis of how Hillel’s statements are reflective of his personal history (in particular his desire not to be Nasi, till he absolutely had to). Avot = models of those particular midot. The tannaim who lived their midot (mentioned in pirkei avot) become like Avot (as in zchut avot) and so can we (Avos dereiyn – at least I remember that) if we act l’sheim shamayim (for heavenly purpose).

  • Rabbi Nisson Lippa Alpert – Behukotai, Bamidbar

    We each need to have the proper self esteem, we each have our own set of abilities and our own roles/destiny, everyone counts.
    Sub units include family, mishmar, tribe – each as a building block.

  • Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik – Shita and Hashkafa of Rabbeinu Tam Part 1, Part 2

    The tfillin of Rabbeinu Tam order of the parshiyot and some lessons. Includes the relationship of mishpatim and chukim and the total commitment to both chukat hatorah [revelation] and chukat hateva [reason] (torah is primary).

  • Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik -Parshas Ki Tisa

    Analysis of the luchot story and the relationship with HKB”H – the meaning of HKB”H saying he will send the malach. General theme is Tshuva (repentance).

  • Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik-asseret hadibrot

    Asseret Hadibrot (10 commandments) has same kedusha as rest of torah. Perhaps because of concern for saying the 10 are more important they aren’t mentioned sometimes (e.g. Shabbat shacharit – R”YBS also gives the Abudraham’s explanation on this). All mitzvot can be categorized under these 10 categories.
    R’YBS then gives examples. Anochi covers morality, prayer and total reliance on HKB”H, Lo Tisa focuses on truth and importance of speech (he was discouraged by the many “frum” slanderers – I wonder if he was referring to those who slandered him?)
    Disagreement in Talmud – did the Jews answer the negatives (e.g. don’t murder) with no, we won’t or yes, we won’t. Difference is no means they wouldn’t have done it anyway – yes means submission to HKB”H – leads into discussion of natural tzaddik vs. one who falls but overcomes.
    Some interesting historical musings as well.

  • Rabbi Ari Kahn -Mourning of the Omer

    How did sfirah evolve from a happy harvest time to a sad mourning period? 1st written source is gaonic, covers all the days and only mentions weddings. Tur mentions no haircuts till lag baomer. Then focus on R’Moshe’s famous flexible finding on observing sfirah followed by R’Sperber’s/Aruch Hashulchan on transition to mourning period due to crusades.
    His psak on music is that non – “jumping/dancing” music is probably OK.

  • Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik-asseret hadibrot 2

    Continuation of Asseret Hadibrot. Use of Ani=action/predicate, use of anochi = identity (to the exclusion of others). Thus anochi hashem defines universal word of God – applicable in all geographies to all kinds of people – including totally spiritual and those more connected to this world.
    Interesting comments on the shift to today’s more intellectual approach – used to be able just to teach masses to do mitzvot without understanding (me – perhaps this is why many feel TUM is for intellectual elite), now every day school kid needs an explanation.
    Asseret written in singular – every individual can make a difference, must withstand social pressures and has no excuses!
    Moshe’s breaking the first luchot as a defense of the Jewish people – no contract. (cuts off in middle)

  • About Joel Rich

    Joel Rich is a frequent local lecturer on various Torah topics in West Orange, NJ and supports his Torah listening habits by working as a consulting actuary.

    25 comments

    1. mir darf vissen

      IIRC, Rabbi Bezalel Rudinsky (rabbirudinsky.org/Shiurim/) explained in one of his shiurim that shome’a k’oneh is an option which one can *choose* to use. Therefore, he feels that stam hearing does not suffice in order to link-in to the other person’s dibbur.

    2. Aryeh Leibowitz

      Regarding the practice of some new yeshivah students, see Teshuvos ve-Hanhagos Chelek 1, siman 108.

    3. Aryeh Leibowitz

      Although, you will see that this doesn’t explain why they don’t daven shmoneh esreh with the tzibbur.

    4. Jonathan David

      I don’t know if this is related to your question, but when I see bochirim davening a 20 minute שמונה עשרי and by doing so miss out on the entire חזרת הש”ץ, I often wonder if this is halachically correct. Is the extra kovana worth the חיוב to hear חזרת הש”ץ?
      I’ve gotten used to the other yeshivasha minhag were the bochirim seem to be playing charades with HaShem or waving their fist at Him. That’s harmless. And entertaining. But these long שמונה עשרי worry me.

    5. R’Al and R’Skeptic,
      Thanks-will look at originals. The article footnote is interesting in itself – how does one decide when it’s OK to say “yesh al mi lsmoch” when it’s a significant minority and especially when they never said why they did the practice? (I know-it’s the halachic heart)
      KT

    6. R’JD,
      I know that’s a constant tension for me because of R’YBS’s position on tfillat hatzibbur making it even more important to “chop” it. I generally err on the side of trying to get done for chazzarat hashatz.
      KT

    7. >But these long שמונה עשרי worry me.

      They’re somewhat frowned upon by the rabbeim in yeshivos themselves. But they recognize that things such as this is one of the few areas of individuality/ near rebellion which a bochur may indulge. If a guy is 16 and he’s suppressing almost every other possible urge or frivolity then there’s a good chance that, even without knowing it, getting up in a shul and openly ignoring what is going on in there is some kind of rebellious release.

    8. R’S,
      Which raises something which I freauently wonder about – the use of religion to scratch certain itches which we may not even be cognizant of.
      KT

    9. Is anyone aware of where recordings of shiurim of R. Shimon Eider may be found?

      In the preface to R. Eider’s “A Summary of the Halachos of the Eruv” he wrote:
      “This Kuntres was prepared to be used as a text for the HALACHOS OF THE ERUV cassettes of the SHIURIM IN HALACHA series.”

      This “Shiurim in Halacha” series sounds very interesting, but I haven’t found a source of it.

    10. R’ David,
      Not aware of these, unfortunately many older tape series were never put up on the net. Just a reminder to all that if you come across any interesting shiurim, please let me know.
      KT

    11. R Joel-what about Smichus Geulah LTefilah? What is the rationale for either arriving late or not davening Smoneh Esreh with the Tzibur?

    12. R’ Joel Rich

      >Which raises something which I freauently wonder about – the use of religion to scratch certain itches which we may not even be cognizant of.

      Indeed.

    13. By the way, I read your sister’s post about your father A”H. Very moving and I’m glad I read it.

    14. Aryeh Leibowitz

      One last source, take a look at the end of vol. 6 in Rav Neventzal’s edition of mishna berura. In the “hanhagos” section on tefila he says that if a person will daven with more kavanah by davening slowly he can forgo the minyan.

    15. “R’JD,
      I know that’s a constant tension for me because of R’YBS’s position on tfillat hatzibbur making it even more important to “chop” it. I generally err on the side of trying to get done for chazzarat hashatz.”
      Agreed

      “Steve Brizel on May 6, 2011 at 10:46 am
      R Joel-what about Smichus Geulah LTefilah? What is the rationale for either arriving late or not davening Smoneh Esreh with the Tzibur?”
      Agreed.

    16. R’AL,
      I’ve heard that position before (BTW I assume you are overseas?)-iirc R’ Moshe rejects it I”M O”C 3:7. I’m very selfish and put my self with the tzibbur whose tfila is tamid nishmat!(but I somewhat understand those that don’t)
      KT

    17. R’S,
      Thank you. As I said there:
      IMHO the reason for the importance of the direct lineage is similar to something I heard in the name of R’ Chaim Kanievski-when asked if one needed to mention the name of the individual one was doing a mitzvah “in honor of” (that’s a whole post in itself), he replied yes, except for a parent since the assumption is that whatever a child does, it directly links to /reflects on the parent (see the last page iirc of the red tent)

      Nicely done although we both know that we could never do justice to the description (which is one of the 2 reasons I attribute his kvurah being erev pesach when no hesped is permitted – and as an ish halacha he wouldn’t have wanted a “we can’t say a hesped but..” loophole (the other of course has to do his son’s quirky personality)

      All I said at the graveside kvurah was “ein osin nfashot latzadikim, divreihem hein hein zichronan.” It was an understatement.

      KT

    18. ” But they recognize that things such as this is one of the few areas of individuality/ near rebellion which a bochur may indulge. If a guy is 16 and he’s suppressing almost every other possible urge or frivolity then there’s a good chance that, even without knowing it, getting up in a shul and openly ignoring what is going on in there is some kind of rebellious release.”

      A vague memory but if I recall correctly Yocheved Schacter RJJS’ wife a social worker, wrote circa a couple of decades ago that a decent percentage of Year in Israel so called frumkeit is in reality a socially acceptable means of teen rebellion.
      If Ms/Rebettzen Schacter meant something else I apologize but I have a 75% confidence in my rough recollection. If someone else wrote it I attempted incorrectly to write something beshem amro.

    19. “he replied yes, except for a parent since the assumption is that whatever a child does, it directly links to /reflects on the parent ”

      IMHO-a false assumption.

    20. “R’ David,
      Not aware of these, unfortunately many older tape series were never put up on the net. Just a reminder to all that if you come across any interesting shiurim, please let me know”

      Are there copyright issues?

    21. Aryeh Leibowitz

      Have no fear, the Rabbi in North Woodmere is not blogging on Shabbas. I live in Shaalvim, and bear the same name as him, sorry for the confusion.

    22. Continuing about R. Eider. I’m aware that they can’t be found on the net. Does anyone know who used to sell them, or of any tape libraries that have them?

      As R. Joel said, “unfortunately many older tape series were never put up on the net.” Some important Torah is on its way to being lost forever. Perhaps there is a need to start an effort to do the equivalent of hebrewbooks.org for recorded shiurim.

      As R. Mycroft suggests, copyright could be a concern, but certainly one could ask the teacher himself or his heirs for permission.

    23. R’AL,
      Yes-I looked at the spelling after I posted(I noticed the difference in pictures when I reviewed one of your shiurim a while back )Perhaps one of you could change your name for my convenience
      🙂
      KT

    24. I’m no yeshiva bochur, but when I became bal tshuva and started davening regularly, I simply didn’t know you could skip anything or that it was important to join the kehilla for certain parts of davening (as opposed to just being there for the minyan in the first place). So there’s that…

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