Journal

Partnership Minyanim Revisited

by R. Aryeh Frimer and R. Dov Frimer (A printable PDF of this essay is available here: link) Partnership Minyanim Revisited: A Response to Rabbi Ysoscher Katz I. Introduction The question of women receiving aliyyot is briefly discussed in a baraita cited in the Talmud Megilla 23a, which reads: תנו רבנן: הכל עולין למנין שבעה, ואפילו קטן ואפילו אשה. אבל אמרו ...

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Gezel Sheina: Stealing Sleep

by R. Ari Enkin To disturb someone who is sleeping or to prevent someone from falling asleep is a violation of gezel sheina.1 In fact, some sources maintain that stealing sleep is even worse than stealing possessions.2 This is because one who steals another person’s possessions can usually make restitution by returning the stolen items or reimbursing the owner for ...

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Kohanim: Air Travel

by R. Ari Enkin Dead bodies are routinely flown in the baggage compartments on passenger flights for burial in distant places. Since it is considered very worthwhile and meritorious to be buried in the Land of Israel, this is an especially frequent occurrence on El Al flights. Indeed, over 65 percent of all El Al flights have dead bodies on ...

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Airplane Travel

by R. Ari Enkin Although it is not widely known, there is a view among halachic authorities that Tefillat Haderech is not recited for airplane travel.1 This is based on the Talmudic teaching that air travel is something associated exclusively with birds and not with people.2 According to this approach, the reason Tefillat Haderech is not recited when flying on ...

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Publicizing the Donors

by R. Ari Enkin Is it proper to publicize the names of donors? The practice of publicizing the names of those who make donations for charitable causes is quite ancient. The Talmud relates that it was publicized that Yosef Ben Yo’ezer made a generous donation to the Beit Hamikdash.1 In fact, the famous “Nicanor Gate” of the Beit Hamikdash was ...

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Knock before Entering!

by R. Ari Enkin Our sages teach that one should not enter any home, even one’s own, without knocking first. As Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai teaches: “There are four things that God hates that I also don’t like…a person who enters his own home suddenly without knocking, and it goes without saying, one who enters his neighbor’s house without knocking.”1 ...

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Noah’s Generations

by R. Ira Bedzow The account of how the generations of the Flood began their institutional depravity begins, וַיְהִי כִּי-הֵחֵל הָאָדָם, לָרֹב עַל-פְּנֵי הָאֲדָמָה, which uses similar language to the beginning of the account given for the previous generation’s fall into idolatry (אָז הוּחַל, לִקְרֹא בְּשֵׁם ה’),1 the beginning of the account of Nimrod’s rise to power (הוּא הֵחֵל, לִהְיוֹת ...

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Noach’s Righteousness

by R. Ira Bedzow The Torah states explicitly that Noach was righteous, wholehearted, and walked with God, yet qualifies the statement to say that he was so in his generations (אִישׁ צַדִּיק תָּמִים הָיָה, בְּדֹרֹתָיו: אֶת-הָאֱלֹקִים, הִתְהַלֶּךְ-נֹח). Rashi, on the phrase, “in his generations,” brings the debate between Rabbi Yochanan and Reish Lakish as to what this qualifier means.  He ...

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