Daily Reyd

 


▪ Dr. David Berger gets it right: Determining the Parameters of Modern Orthodoxy
▪ Prof. Joshua Berman at a predominantly Christian Bible-history conference: Kiddush with Grace
Pruzansky: The Exchange, Part 2
Helfand: Implied Consent
Gordis: What Made Israel’s Early Leaders Great? A Biblical Worldview
A New Dialogue in Eretz Yisroel – The Transformative Model
▪ Archeology of the Maccabees: Maccabees at Home
Peter Berger: What Is Religious Freedom Good For?
▪ This is what happens when religion is seen as the enemy and entirely incompatible with life in a modern country: Tel Aviv approves limited business on Shabbat

 

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Gil Student

Rabbi Gil Student is the founder, publisher and editor-in-chief of Torah Musings.

 
The opinions and facts here are presented solely by the author. Torah Musings assumes no responsibility for them. Please address religious questions to your rabbi.
 

3 Responses

  1. dgershuny says:

    Tel Aviv’s decision to allow business on Shabbat and Chagim raises the question as to why the Arabs (and the world) should recognize Israel as a Jewish State when many Jews who live there don’t.

    • Gil Student says:

      I think the Secular point is that there is more than one way to observe Shabbat and Chagim. Rejecting Orthodoxy does not necessarily mean rejecting a Jewish identity. Not that I approve of Chillul Shabbos but we should at least understand what we are discussing.

  2. Nachum Lamm says:

    To be dan l’kaf zechut, it’s entirely possible to keep a shop open on Shabbat and not violate any d’oraytas (or even, strictly speaking, d’rabbanans). Many traditional Israelis keep every d’orayta and aren’t so careful about d’rabbanans. Some are even learned enough to be conscious of this fact- I’ve heard some say it aloud.

    That said, I agree with Gil’s point and bemoan lost opportunities.

 
 

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