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The Quick Mincha II…Heicha Kedusha

 

By: Rabbi Ari Enkin

When time is running short or the members of the minyan are unable to remain assembled for a prolonged period of time, many congregations implement an abridged form of the repetition, known as the heicha kedusha.[2] When the heicha kedusha form of repetition is used it is generally only the first three blessings of the Shemoneh Esrei that are recited out loud.[3] This abbreviated form of the repetition is generally only used at Mincha time, but is occasionally employed when needed at Shacharit, as well.

There are a number of customs on how the heicha kedusha repetition is performed. Some authorities recommend that everyone begin reciting the Shemoneh Esrei together out loud when performing a heicha kedusha, saying it word for word with the chazzan, including the Kedusha.[4] Common Ashkenazic custom, however, is for the chazzan to begin the Shemoneh Esrei out loud alone while the congregation responds to his blessings and recites the Kedusha responsively, as if it were a regular repetition.[5] According to all customs, at the conclusion of the Kedusha the chazzan continues silently to himself while everyone else then begins his own silent Shemoneh Esrei from the beginning.[6]

There are a number of other methods for performing the heicha kedusha, as well.[7] In situations where time is very short, however, such as at Mincha when there are only one or two minutes remaining before sunset, it is best that everyone commence his Shemoneh Esrei at the same time as the leader.[8] Incidentally, in the event that when one is about to begin the silent Shemoneh Esrei one notices that the chazzan is about to begin his repetition, one should recite the Shemoneh Esrei along with him word for word – at least for the first three blessings.[9]

Among the rationalizations for doing a heicha kedusha and forgoing the full repetition is because in our day it is essentially forbidden for one to rely on the repetition in order to discharge one’s obligation to pray.[10] Since most people are able to recite the silent Shemoneh Esrei on their own, either in English or Hebrew, the need for a repetition in our day is minimized. Indeed, it is reported that the Rambam did away with the repetition of Shemoneh Esrei entirely because people weren’t properly paying attention to it or responding amen when required.

Make no mistake, the repetition of the Shemoneh Esrei is one of the enduring enactments of our sages and must never be compromised.[11] Indeed, there was once a cherem placed on congregations that did not conduct the repetition of the Shemoneh Esrei in its entirety.[12] The heicha kedusha method is not recommend for regular use and should only be implemented in extenuating circumstances.[13] This is especially true on Chanuka and Purim when the public recitation of al hanissim is a mitzva in its own right and would not be recited out loud as part of the heicha kedusha.[14] The Arizal was very particular to ensure that all prayer services included the full repetition of the Shemoneh Esrei even if it meant that the repetition of a Friday Mincha would extend into Shabbat.[15]


[1] Tur, OC 124.

[2] Beit Yosef, OC 232:1.

[3] Although there is reference to a custom of the leader also reciting the last three blessings out loud as well. Biur Halacha 232.

[4] OC 109:2,232:1; Kaf Hachaim, OC 124:10; Yalkut Yosef 1, p. 129.

[5] Rema, OC 109:2,124:2; Mishna Berura 232:8; Aruch Hashulchan, OC 232:3–6; Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 69:6.

[6] Biur Halacha 124:2; Aruch Hashulchan, OC 232:6.

[7] Aruch Hashulchan, OC 232:3–6; Pri Megadim, OC 124:5.

[8] Rema, OC 124:2.

[9] Tefilla K’hilchata 13:8, n. 18.

[10] Rambam, Hilchot Tefilla 8:9; Tur, OC 124.

[11] Aruch Hashulchan, OC 232:3.

[12] Beit Yosef, OC 234.

[13] Mishna Berura 124:6.

[14] Tefilla K’hilchata 18 n. 10.

[15] Kaf Hachaim, OC  232:8.

 

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About the author

Ari Enkin

Rabbi Ari N. Enkin is a researcher and writer of contemporary halachic issues. He is the author of “The Dalet Amot Halacha Series” (6 Vol.) among other works of halacha. rabbiari@hotmail.com

 
The opinions and facts here are presented solely by the author. Torah Musings assumes no responsibility for them. Please address religious questions to your rabbi.
 

74 Responses

  1. kj says:

    I believe the Spanish – Portuguese Synagogue in NYC still does only a public Shemoneh Esreh (no private recitation) for mussaf on shabbat

  2. MDJ says:

    That is correct re S&P.

  3. joel rich says:

    Indeed, it is reported that the Rambam did away with the repetition of Shemoneh Esrei entirely because people weren’t properly paying attention to it or responding amen when required.

    ================================
    source? for some reason I recall it being a suggestion, not that it was actually done.
    also iirc there are 2 practices – ata kadosh or ldor vador – for kahal.
    KT

  4. Eric says:

    What about the the late-comers to mincha who catch the minyan right after mincha with a heicha kadisha on their way out so that they can say kedushah? It would seem that there is a problem of tircha d’tzibbura and not having a majority of people who haven’t davened, but it’s pretty common. Any sources for this?

    Eric

  5. anonymous says:

    Did you really mean to say that, even according to the custom where the congregation starts with the chazzan, they go back to the beginning of shemoneh esreh after kedushah?

  6. aenkin says:

    KJ-

    Thats wild. Who’s the rabbi there? This is certianly abnormal practice.

    Ari Enkin

  7. aenkin says:

    Joel-

    I did indeed see it inside a sefer. Dont remember where right now.

    Ari

  8. aenkin says:

    Eric-

    Yes. There is a source for this.

    Ari Enkin

  9. aenkin says:

    Anonymous-

    No,no. In a situation where everyone started with the chazzan, everyone goes silent after the kedusha.

    Ari Enkin

  10. J. says:

    What about minhag hayeshivos? Are they simply in error? If you are criticizing them for their practice, you should at least ask them if they can justify it first. I”m surprised you didn’t bring R. Yaakov Kameneskty’s taana about Chazaras HaShatz not being intended for talmidei chachamim.

  11. kj says:

    I believe it’s Rabbi Marc D. Angel

  12. Cohen says:

    I don’t remember the details, but I was once told that in a least one (perhaps more) of the pre-war litvishe yeshivos, the heicha SE was performed every day at mincha, ostensibly to allow the bochurim to return to their learning more quickly. Does anyone have any information on this?

    Another point that comes to mind is, where in this discussion does the issue of davening mincha in “unconventional” settings fit it. For example, at the workplace, where there are good reasons for wanting minyanim to be as discrete and quick as is practical, or in other secular settings where we would not want to draw any undue attention to ourselves?

  13. Nachum says:

    Ari: How can you say “wild” and “abnormal”? There are lots of different nuschaot and minhagim; the S-P preserve old customs better than most.

    Joel: R’ Seth Mandel once told me that the Rav’s practice was to say it together with the chazzan. I recall him saying that “l’dor vador” is a problem in that case- do you say it with the chazan? (I also don’t know about the non-pesukim parts of kedusha.)

  14. Nachum says:

    R’ Hayyim Angel is rabbi there now.

    Cohen: It was common practice in many Ltvish yeshivot. R’ Rakeffet recently reported in a shiur that the attitude toward Mincha in general in Litvish yeshivas was not one we are used to, to say the least.

  15. william gewirtz says:

    Using sunset proper as the reason to prefer a “haicha kedusha” (versus say 4 – 15 minutes after sunset) is hardly a settled issue. See the letter on the beginning of shabbat always printed in siddur of the Baal haTanya, R. Chaim Volozhin tosefet maaseh rav seif 19, R. Kapach’s commentary on Rambam and Minhag Yemen, Minhagei eretz israel, among many others.

  16. MDJ says:

    R. Angel fils is now the rabbi, with his father the senior Rabbi, but I can testify that I observed the musaf practice in question in R. Marc Angel’s time. However, as Nachum pointed out, Spanish and Portuguese shuls are about as focused on their minhagim as Yekkes. It never even crossed my mind that this was anything other than the longstanding practice of the S&P Jews.

  17. ak says:

    I davened last year with a sefardi minyan in the south of France where their regular practice was to do hecha kedusha for Shacharit. They did not seem to be doing this to save time as they took at least 15 minutes for Korbanot.

  18. Hirhurim says:

    joel rich: source? for some reason I recall it being a suggestion, not that it was actually done.

    The Rambam instituted it in Egypt and the Radbaz revoked it. See Responsa Radbaz vol. 4 no. 94 (1165).

  19. S. says:

    Re S & P, my guess is that it is an old minhag – yet a relic of a mild 19th century reform.

  20. Ari Enkin says:

    Nachum-

    “Wild” was intended in the slang/street context, as we say in Israel, “magniv”, but it IS abnormal.

    You are telling me that several hundred men and women* remain completely silent and focus on every word of the mussaf chazarat hashatz in order to be yotzai?

    Look, if its a minhag from dorei doros, then fine. maybe. But in today’s day and age no one can keep focused that long, which is why we must recite our own shemoneh esreis.

    Ari Enkin

    * I’m working on a post on whether or not women are obligated to say mussaf.

  21. S. says:

    >But in today’s day and age no one can keep focused that long, which is why we must recite our own shemoneh esreis.

    No one can keep focused on the chazaras ha-sha”tz.

  22. Ari Enkin says:

    J. –

    You’re right. That is an angle to the issue I did not present.

    But note: In LKWD R’ Aharon ruled that there are no H.K. on Chanuka (and Purim?) because the public recitation of al hanissim is pirsumei nissa.

    Ari Enkin

  23. Ezra says:

    “According to all customs, at the conclusion of the Kedusha the hazzan continues silently to himself while everyone else then begins his own silent Shemoneh Esrei from the beginning”

    No, not according to all customs. Sepharadim continue on from Atah Chonen. Why does this blog always say things like that: ‘all Jews’ do this, its ‘minhag yisrael’ to do that. Please don’t presume to speak for all of Judaism when you’re knowledge of Sepharadi halacha is woefully limited.

  24. Ari Enkin says:

    Ezra-

    Sustained. Yes my knowledge of Sefardi customs is woefully limited.
    Ari Enkin

  25. Scott says:

    Shouldn’t you explain for the Yiddish-challenged what the words “heiche kedushah” mean?

  26. Nachum says:

    “Look, if its a minhag from dorei doros, then fine. maybe. But in today’s day and age no one can keep focused that long, which is why we must recite our own shemoneh esreis.”

    You’re putting the cart before the horse. Chazarat HaShatz was invented because most people didn’t have siddurim and didn’t know the Amidah by heart. I have no idea how the S-P moved so far from the original idea, but that’s them.

    As it happens, we’re all supposed to stay focused on Chazarat HaShatz whatever we say, and some people actually do. (This is probably easier for Musaf, which is shorter.)

  27. Shimon S says:

    No silent tefillah for Musaf is (was?) also the minhag of most yemenite kehillos (at least baladi). I’ve seen it many times. In general, musaf is more connected with tzibur than other tefillos.

  28. Shimon S says:

    Re: william gewirtz on November 16, 2010 at 9:00 am

    I believe we’ve been there before: there is no Tosfos Maase Rav 19 about this inyan.

    Also, can you please be more specific about R’ Kapachas commentary?

  29. joel rich says:

    Joel: R’ Seth Mandel once told me that the Rav’s practice was to say it together with the chazzan. I recall him saying that “l’dor vador” is a problem in that case- do you say it with the chazan? (I also don’t know about the non-pesukim parts of kedusha.)
    ===================
    that’s what I was taught- to say word for word so there is a true tfilat hatzibbur (which is why I am adamant on the point to the chagrin of my friends – I want R’YBS’s understanding of tfillat hatzibbur as more than a way for unknowledgable to be yotze but rather “taamid nishmat” to be true)
    KT

  30. Ari Enkin says:

    Heicha Kudusha = Loud Kedusha

    A

  31. joel rich says:

    R’ Gil
    B”N will look but look at sh”ut Harambam 256 -there it’s a little less clear (but you are likely right) and I always remembered it as just for when it’s late – also what is the reference there at the end to R’ Avraham ben harambam-doesn’t sound like the Rambam writing????

    oh & btw for all those who do this-see his comment about Rabbis who learn during chazarat hashatz
    KT

  32. joel rich says:

    . I”m surprised you didn’t bring R. Yaakov Kameneskty’s taana about Chazaras HaShatz not being intended for talmidei chachamim.
    ===========================
    And did they do it for shacharit at his Yeshiva?
    KT

  33. Jacob says:

    The Rambam got rid of the silent Amidah! The logic was clear. Those who could say the amida on their own could say it with the hazzan and didn’t need the repetition. Those who couldn’t, would follow along with the hazzan.

  34. Ari Enkin says:

    No. Only for mincha.

    Ari Enkin

  35. S. says:

    Although I think that my suspicion that the S-P mussaph practice was a slight reform was plausible, I now see that I am wrong.

    In 1892, under pressure from various British congregations to sanction reforms, Chief Rabbi Hermann Adler composed a reply where he carefully detailed what was and was not permissible. It’s an extraordinary document; he forbade the men to say Sheasani Kirtzono instead of Shelo asani isha; he permitted removal of the second Yekum Purkan, and so forth.

    Here is the page on Chazaras Ha-sha”tz:

    http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/3849/theritual00adleiala0009.jpg

    As you can see, he acknowledges that the S-P in London and in Amsterdam read the amida only one time by mincha and mussaph on shabbat and y”t and bases his reply on the legitimacy of their traditional practice.

  36. Ira says:

    The yeshiva I went to for high school, would say a “heicha” shmonah esrei for mincha, but instituted that on Chanukah, they would have a full chazaras Hashatz. (They also stopped saying Behab in later years there, because of “bittul torah”, go figure)

    At the same time the shul that was in the same building, would say a heicha shmonah esrei for shacharis when they had a minyan in the morning. (They would have a minyan of people there, but not enough davening)

  37. Jonathan Berger says:

    (Conservative) Rabbi David Golinkin has a piece on this, including the etymology of “heiche,” which he says was really “hoiche” (see footnote 1). He also cites many additional sources for old minhagim–from the geonim and on–if you’re curious. See http://www.responsafortoday.com/vol5/6.pdf.

  38. Ari Enkin says:

    S.-

    Whoa! That piece is written in British!

    Someone should translate it into English.
    ;-)

    Ari Enkin

  39. Skeptic says:

    Jonathan,

    He says no such thing in footnote one. Heiche is just a common pronunciation of the word he spells הויכע

  40. S. says:

    R. Enkin, it was written in 1892ish. :-)

  41. Shmuel says:

    S.

    Is the rest of this available?

  42. Litvak says:

    Heicha is just a Litvishe pronuncation of what would be in Polish pronunciation hoicha (or hoich’er), from the German hoch (=high, loud in context of sound/volume).

    It is just the old Litvishe pronunciation of the cholam as cheylam being used, as in Tayreh for תורה.

    It is interesting to see people adopting or retaining that pronuciation in the case, where they don’t use for other words.

  43. Michael Gordan says:

    I have it from a member of the Amsterdam snoge who grew up there after WWII that the practice of not repeating the musaf amidah was a source of constant friction between chacham, chazan, kahal. R. Ari Enkin is imagining the practice (at least in Amsterdam, and also in Philadelphia) somewhat incorrectly – after kedushah, the kahal and chazan recite silently until Modim, when the chazan suddenly ‘surfaces’ again. It has never been clear to me how this was supposed to work.

  44. william gewirtz says:

    Shimon S on November 16, 2010 at 11:11 am
    Re: william gewirtz on November 16, 2010 at 9:00 am

    I believe we’ve been there before: there is no Tosfos Maase Rav 19 about this inyan.

    Also, can you please be more specific about R’ Kapachas commentary?
    ————————————–
    Please see Masseh Rav, the beginning of chapter 25 hilchot pesukai dezimrah, KS and tefillah, footnote 25, in bnai brak edition 5750. it quotes seif 19 as does R. Beinish on one of the first pages of vol. 2. It is a remarkable statement, that as I explained in a shiur a few nights ago, maps to astronomic observation.

    See R. Kapach on “hu hanikreh bein hashemashot” in hilchot shabbat, the ability of BD to declare RC after sunset in hilchot kiddush hachodesh, and hilchot trumot and maaserot, chapter 7(i believe) and about a dozen other places.

    i do not agree with how r. kapach explains rambam’s POV; some of his astronomy is imprecise and Rambam would certainly have known that. i also do not believe he proves 15 minutes; for what its worth i am more comfortable with (8-) 12 minutes.

  45. Ira says:

    Wow, he says that you shouldn’t blow shofar after yom kippur until after maariv. (and maariv should be started earlier, so not to prolong the fast)

  46. MiMedinat HaYam says:

    re: not on purim and chanukkah:

    what about rosh chodesh (ya’aleh ve’yavoh), tannit (aneinu; or nachem, for that matter). and to go to a further extreme, shabat, chag?

    (isnt havenenu not said, per masechet berachot, then for these reasons?)

    re: shofar

    actually, one may blow shofar even before “tzeit hacochavim”, though i have yet to see anyone that does.

    re: s & p
    sefardim differ in customs among diff communities, even more so than ashkenazim. the tendency among sefardim is to keep separate minhagim; the tendency among ashkenazim is to standardize. esp s&p , which really are a class among themselves.

  47. Shimon S says:

    Re: william gewirtz on November 16, 2010 at 1:00 pm

    Again, we’ve been there. R’ Mordechai Zlushinsky in his Maase Rav Hashalem (p. 35, fn. 1) misquotes Tosfos M”R. This footnote is clearly the source for R’ Benish in Hazmanim Behalacha (p. 326, 1st fn.) and you.

    Do you have an original source that we can look up?

    http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=35342&st=&pgnum=8&hilite=

  48. Shimon S says:

    r Gil, can you please delete my post from 2:41 pm, it was send by mistake.

  49. Shimon S says:

    R’ Gewirtz,

    Re: Tosfos Maase Rav: You are right and I was wrong. It is there.

  50. william gewirtz says:

    MiMedinat HaYam on November 16, 2010 at 2:25 pm

    (actually, one may blow shofar even before “tzeit hacochavim”, though i have yet to see anyone that does.

    ideally you blow shofar after neillah at chashekha roughly 3 medium stars (~ 20 minutes after sunset in jerusalem) and end maariv at three small stars about ten minutes later. you could even duchin at neilah before bein hashemashot (about 8 – 12 minutes after sunset) with some precision. (some even allow to duchin during bein hashemashot and a few poskim allow even at night.) i wonder if there is any history of what was done in the 18th/19th century in israel?

  51. Tzvi says:

    MiMedinat HaYam on November 16, 2010 at 2:25 pm

    re: not on purim and chanukkah:

    what about rosh chodesh (ya’aleh ve’yavoh), tannit (aneinu; or nachem, for that matter). and to go to a further extreme, shabat, chag?

    _____________

    It’s a pirsuma nisa issue, not applicable on other times.

    For the record, in MTJ lakewood and Torah Vadass (IIRC) they do a hoiche hedusha, in YU, at least in the main BM they don’t as well as in most Israeli Yeshivos.
    So it would seem, as mentioned, that this was done in various european yeshivos and transferred to the uS but not Israel?

    On Friday the minch gedola minyan in lakewood and MTJ does the short version,(even though there’s no second seder) but not the minyanim around town in lakewood, which generally follow th minhag hayeshiva right before kabalas shabbos.

  52. Shlomo says:

    “It is interesting to see people adopting or retaining that pronuciation in the case, where they don’t use for other words.”

    Because few people know where the word “heicha” comes from or what it means. Everyone knows that “tayrah” comes from “Torah”.

  53. william gewirtz says:

    Shimon S on November 16, 2010 at 2:46 pm
    R’ Gewirtz,

    Re: Tosfos Maase Rav: You are right and I was wrong. It is there.
    —————–

    Thank you – where do you find the orignal? i only have the copied footnote. My interpretation of kokhav echad yom is that a medium star CAN appear prior to bein hashemashot. that star is Sirius that is visible to real expert with great concentration 6 minutes after sunset in the spring – exactly what RCV says! the language that bein hashemashot starts then or at some point later supports how i reads the first part of shmuel’s statement. kochav echad gives the lower bound and shenai kochavim BH gives the upper bound on the start of BH. BH starts between those points; shmuel is giving other simanim than R. yehudah. all the other readings of shmuel i have seen have observational or textual issues. i hope this is what RCV meant.

  54. Shimon S says:

    R’ Gewirtz,

    Please accept my apology. I was stupid enough to rely on new edition of TMR that renumbered the simanim to match the original MR. In the original edition, the MR is the main text and TMR is lower on the page in a smaller font (almost footnotes). See here, bottom of the page, indeed TMR 19.

    http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=35342&st=&pgnum=13

    He said a 10th of an hour. Probably 6 normal minutes.

  55. william gewirtz says:

    Shimon S, pls no apologies. zemanim between shikyah and tzait (kol) hakokhavim DO NOT vary by normal shaot zemaniot. for 6 minutes there is seasonal variation but it is very, very slight and not correlated to the length of the daytime period. so i believe 6 normal minutes is correct.

    very clear from this text RCV means > 1/10 of an hour.

    thanks for the link.

  56. kedusha says:

    According to all customs, at the conclusion of the Kedusha the chazzan continues silently to himself while everyone else then begins his own silent Shemoneh Esrei from the beginning.

    R. Soloveitchik (Nefesh Ha-Rav, p. 126) didn’t believe so. In R. Rosensweig’s shiur- they would do heiche kedusha every day, and he would daven along.

  57. gavi says:

    one source is a shut in the radbaz, I’m blanking on the exact location, where the Jews of Egypt r asking him whether to continue following the takkanah, teimani Jews still pasken like the ramban today

  58. joel rich says:

    what about on fast days – do they give up birchat kohanim?

    When R’MR got up to modim – which did he say or did he say both?

    side question – what is the relative importance of the kahal saying modim drabbanan?

    KT

  59. MiMedinat HaYam says:

    litvaks have a tendency to use a “tzerei” instead of a “komatz” (just like they supposedly cant say “sin” and say “shin”.)

    i guess the “teirah” would be more pronounced (?pun”) in the (more) standardized american millieu.

  60. Living in the 5 towns says:

    yeshiva torah vodaath did not do a haycha kedusha.

  61. MiMedinat HaYam says:

    “It’s a pirsuma nisa issue, not applicable on other times.”

    but if you forget “al hanissim”, you dont have to repeat shmoneh esreh, but if you forget “yaaleh veyavo”, you must repeat.

    2. yeshiva torah vadaat has mizrachi origins; their original minhag must not have been heicha kedusha. also, if they were educating for (original) america’s future, they would want to emphasize full shmoneh esreh.

  62. Charlie Hall says:

    From “MINHAGIM of The Congregation Shearith Israel In the City of New York” prepared by Rabbi Hayyim J. Angel:

    “We read the Amidah of Musaf and Minhah aloud, with no repetition. Congregants should read along silently with the Hazan, and not answer Amen”

  63. Charlie Hall says:

    The Yeshiva of Telshe Alumni in Riverdale always does a heicha kedushah at minchah, as does the 2pm minchah minyan at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

  64. Charlie Hall says:

    “R. Soloveitchik (Nefesh Ha-Rav, p. 126) didn’t believe so.”

    And the psak I got when I asked the shilah was to follow R. Soloveitchik and not go back to the beginning.

  65. Charlie Hall says:

    “what about on fast days – do they give up birchat kohanim? ”

    On fast days the 2pm minchah minyan at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine davens in a different location and does repeat the shemoneh esrei.

  66. Nachum says:

    Doesn’t Torah Vodaath daven Nusach Sephard? I’d think the heicha kedusha is mostly an Ashkenaz thing, but I could be wrong. (The only other Litvish yeshiva I know that davens Sephard is Touro’s.)

    I also wonder what Kohanim do at S-P- they walk out to wash their hands and then walk up to the front in the middle of their shemona esrei?

  67. kj says:

    Its chu”l – so they would only do Birchat Cohanim except on 3 Regalim. If you look at the page from R Adler’s guide supplied by “S.” its says that it is “reccomended” that the regular Amida followed by repetition. If they do do only one Amida it seems the chazan pauses to allow to the cohanim to finish themselves and then they go up

  68. Nachum says:

    kj, many Sephardim duchan every day even in chu”l. I don’t know what the S-P do, but OK: What do they do Musaf of Shalosh Regalim?

  69. MiMedinat HaYam says:

    without commenting on any particular minyan’s minhagim, birkat cohanim is not dependent on shemona esreh / original or repetition.

    in fact, sefardim (edot mizrach) have a (bad) habit of doing it during weddings (and those syrians start their weddings at 11pm) prob because its a joyous public meeting (though rav ovadiah is vehemently against it, i still hear of it being done even though he is present) (joyous, obviously = embibing; enough said). a cohen friend of mine tells me he was asked to participate in front of a 770 wedding (all lubavitch weddings are held in front of 770). one final note, edot mizrach does not mean s&p.

  70. Nachum says:

    Sure, it’s done at all sorts of smachot- not to the kahal, but, say, to the couple at a wedding, the baby at a pidyon haben, etc. In Israel, random people on street, mostly Sephardim, ask for it. I don’t see why you think it’s “bad”- no bracha is said; at the very worst, the kohein is just saying three pesukim that every Jew says every morning.

  71. Charlie Hall says:

    ” I don’t know what the S-P do”

    I’ve only been to Shearith Israel twice for weekday shacharit, but on neither occasion was birkat kohanim done.

  72. MiMedinat HaYam says:

    i mean “birkat cohanim” done with a bracha, with duchening on a “duchan”, with hands held in the relevant position (covered with a talit, of course).

    what we consider “avoda”

  73. Anonymous says:

    Was just in Ner Yisrael of Baltimore where they say Heicha Kedusha for Mincha every day.

 
 

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